Selecting Your Tattoo Design

Published on January 18, 2014 by Jodie M
The tattoo process is very lengthy and detailed. A body art enthusiast may not know all of the factors that go into getting a tattoo, such as how painful it will be, how much it will cost, the desirable size, or even what design they want. 
 
Because body modification is so entailed, individuals must be patient and 100% confident in the decision they are making as it is irreversible.  Tattoos can be breathtaking and beautiful, but if the correct precautions are not met they can quickly lead to regret. You need to think about how to pick a design, how to choose an artist, and many more factors first to ensure a positive outcome.
 
In addition, the process is filled with many unknown factors that can only be determined after getting tattooed. The tattoo might come out terrible and you might hate it, the ink may cause an allergic reaction, you may lose your job, your family might excommunicate you (slightly dramatic) and most importantly IT IS PERMANENT (unless you can afford laser removal surgery which is very expensive and not always a guarantee to rid the tattoo anyway).
 

Selecting Your Tattoo Design

Before you opt for anything permanent you should first ask yourself if the inspiration behind the tattoo is meaningful and personal. For starters, is it a memorial for someone dear or does it celebrate the birth of a child? Will the design mark your identity or stake a bit of freedom? 
 
Perhaps you’re commemorating a milestone in your life such as a graduation, career change, or other personal goal? All of these reasons are sufficient enough for making a permanent, yet artful mark on your body.
 
Whatever your motivation might be for a tattoo, chances are you have plenty of ideas dancing about in your head. Can you visualize what elements you’d like included in your design and do you know what sort of art style appeals to you? 
 
There are several basic tattoo art styles, some of which include Realism, Japanese and Old School tattoos. Or you can opt for a more cultured piece in a tribal or abstract design. Once you determine the style you connect with, you’ll need to decide if you want vivid and colorful ink on your skin, or if you dream in shades of black and grey.
 

Finding Inspiration

For muses, some people look to their favorite art styles or to an event that happened earlier in their life. Others may get their tattoo ideas from celebrities and people that they look up to or respect. Some cultures prefer to have tattoos of their deities with hopes they will bring luck and power.
 
An online tattoo gallery can be used to get inspired for the types of tattoos you might like. Helpful and easy to use galleries often have designs separated into different categories so that you can search and find the tattoos easily.
 
Another way to scroll through types of tattoos is to go to individual artists’ profiles to see their professional galleries. This is a good way to see if the artist is reliable and credible. If they are, they'll have plenty of great tattoos in their gallery as well as lots of followers and reviews proving their worth. It's also a great way to discover how the tattoo artist operates.
 
Because there is literally an endless well of inspiration for tattoo artwork that is growing every day, there is no end to the search. The best thing to do is to start from within, from individual desires and expression and then build on top of that with your search.
 
Since tattoos are a reflection of personality, are permanent, and are an art form, work with your tattoo artist or a competent tattoo designer you can find right here on tattoo.com to take the concept and turn it into a masterpiece. When picking a tattoo design, stay away from “flash” and use it only as a guide to help spark your imagination. 
 
Once the artist has drawn up a design for you or at least a rough, spend time to think really hard about it. A common method suggested by tattoo artists is to take a picture and tape it to the wall facing you while in bed or on the ceiling so it’s something you look at often. 
 
If you get sick of the design then chances are you will not want it inked permanently. These small steps may sound tedious but it’s better to realize that you don’t love the design before it sets up permanent shop on your body.
 
With all of these important considerations at hand, the decision making process has just begun. Luckily the design planning is one of the most introspective and rewarding steps once you differentiate between your likes, dislikes, and define your personal style.